Doormat Levy

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Jon1984
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Joined: 22 Aug 2017 03:25

#1 Doormat Levy

Post by Jon1984 » 02 Oct 2017 18:35

I have been reading this forum and its associated links for quite a while. What interests me is the "Doormat Levy" which while illegal (i think?) has actually happened to me albeit a long time ago - perhaps 2001 / 2002.

A bailiff from Rossendales was collecting Council Tax and visited me while I was out. When I got home there was a notice through the letterbox and my door mat had vanished. The notice said that the mat had been removed to discharge part of my debt - to the value of 50 pence. This is honestly a true story but I was young and naive and never took the effort to contest the Levy. I never contacted the bailiff and he never returned. I wish I still had the paperwork regarding the matter although it would be too late to complain now anyway.

At the time I lived in a flat with a communal entrance. This communal entrance was never locked so he could just walk in, but he never gained access to my flat itself. Would this particular Levy have been legal? (It was long before 2014)

What are the guidelines for removing goods from outside premises. I know they go for the car if possible but I don't drive so that's out of the question. I now live in a mid terrace with gardens to front and rear that are easily accessible (i.e. not locked) There is nothing of particular value in saleable terms but could a bailiff legally Levy on a hanging basket or some other fixture or fitting and then gain access to the property itself on grounds of peaceable entry to my garden?

It's Equita this time round by the way. :D

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Pote Snitkin
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#2 Re: Doormat Levy

Post by Pote Snitkin » 02 Oct 2017 19:42

No - taking control of items outside does not mean he has gained access to the property that would allow a later forced entry - except I suppose if he took control of your antique gnome collection putting a wee little clamp on each one and you then moved them into the kitchen. :xmas_mrgreen:

The usual procedure is to target a vehicle and clamp it. They can also force open any outbuildings not attached to the property. They can try any external door to see if it's unlocked and if so can walk in. They cannot climb over fences or locked gates nor enter through a window. They cannot put a hand through a window to reach round to unlock a door.
On 29/07/17, Compo said "If you are interested I actually typed the word label. My spell checker interpreted it as liable" Discuss.

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Schedule 12
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#3 Re: Doormat Levy

Post by Schedule 12 » 02 Oct 2017 20:26

Jon1984 wrote:
02 Oct 2017 18:35


A bailiff from Rossendales was collecting Council Tax and visited me while I was out. When I got home there was a notice through the letterbox and my door mat had vanished. The notice said that the mat had been removed to discharge part of my debt - to the value of 50 pence. This is honestly a true story but I was young and naive and never took the effort to contest the Levy. I never contacted the bailiff and he never returned. I wish I still had the paperwork regarding the matter although it would be too late to complain now anyway.
There is no time limit for a complaint. The only redress you have is the replacement cost of a doormat.

Recently a judge ruled the value of the goods is the sum raised at the auction, but it is unlikely a bailiff has the sales invoice for your doormat.

The LGO in 2012 said that is the fees were disproportionate and should be refunded.



At the time I lived in a flat with a communal entrance. This communal entrance was never locked so he could just walk in, but he never gained access to my flat itself. Would this particular Levy have been legal? (It was long before 2014)



What are the guidelines for removing goods from outside premises. I know they go for the car if possible but I don't drive so that's out of the question. I now live in a mid terrace with gardens to front and rear that are easily accessible (i.e. not locked) There is nothing of particular value in saleable terms but could a bailiff legally Levy on a hanging basket or some other fixture or fitting and then gain access to the property itself on grounds of peaceable entry to my garden?

It's Equita this time round by the way. :D
Bailiffs can take goods outside the property. They will target cars rather than a rusting BBQ or a trampoline in the garden. Hanging baskets are not something bailiffs can sell at an auction. They need to be pragmatic.

The new regulations disposed of charges for making a levy. Its only for attending and disbursements for the auction costs

Council tax is enforced using a "liability order". Unlike a warrant or writ of control, liability orders do not confer a power to enter your garden. Unless you have a sign at the entrance of your garden telling them to leave, they can enter the garden but cannot enter buildings unless invited.
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Author: dealingwithbailiffs.co.uk

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Pote Snitkin
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#4 Re: Doormat Levy

Post by Pote Snitkin » 02 Oct 2017 22:09

Schedule 12 wrote:
02 Oct 2017 20:26
Recently a judge ruled the value of the goods is the sum raised at the auction, but it is unlikely a bailiff has the sales invoice for your doormat.
Which tier of court was that in?
Unlike a warrant or writ of control, liability orders do not confer a power to enter your garden.
Yes, but the liability order is enforced under a warrant so the garden can be entered. A LO standing alone is useless unless it's enforced.
On 29/07/17, Compo said "If you are interested I actually typed the word label. My spell checker interpreted it as liable" Discuss.

John The Baptist
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#5 Re: Doormat Levy

Post by John The Baptist » 03 Oct 2017 00:26

The situation is that the bailiff levied upon your doormat because he was able to charge extra fees for doing so. I have provided you a link to an Ombudsman decision for a similar scenario for your information. Whether you can do anything about it now, I do not know. You were certainly charged a levy fee that was unlawful though.

Since April 2014, bailiffs have not been able to charge extra fees for levying goods so you have nothing to worry about on that score. However, your goods are at risk if you are facing the prospect of a bailiff visit. Pote Snitkin has provided you with the correct information.
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